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Laska Nenova - ISCA

How do we measure the impact of outdoor/urban physical activity programs?

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  • What’s the impact of walking and cycling on urban congestion?
  • What happens when you remove a car lane to put in a new bicycle lane?
  • Or you give pedestrians more time to cross a busy road? Several cities have made these improvements and measured their impacts.
  • How to monitor and evaluate the success of initiatives in MOVEment spaces?

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Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of activities is important. They allow you to  assess whether urban space and its activities achieve objectives or not. It provides also indications of progress, or lack of progress. It therefore regarded both as informative and formative, because it provides information that led to improvement of activities and offers data that assist you in terms of decision-making, effectiveness, and accountability. And it provides data as evidence base to communicate with partners, stakeholders and funders.  For a good M&E we need to define criteria for success. and then plan the measurement and evaluation of the impact. To start with, I suggest to use a simple evaluation tool or use existing tools. Here is one that might help you: s System for Observing Play And Recreation in Communities - a reliable and valid observation tool for assessing park and recreation areas: https://activelivingresearch.org/soparc-system-observing-play-and-recreation-communities 

With M&E results you might have researched a potentials that can help you to contact potential funders. Thats why pitch your good idea and improve your advocacy process.

Here is also a Guide that present how evidence and facts can help cities decision makers, urban planners and sport organisations develop MOVEment spaces in the communities.  

Towards More Physical Activity in Cities - Transforming public spaces to promote physical activity — a key contributor to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in Europe, developed by WHO Europe: http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/disease-prevention/physical-activity/news/news/2017/11/planning-cities-to-boost-physical-activity

This Guidebook guides you through two concepts: physical activity as part of everyday life and the built environment. Both of these concepts have many different aspects, but this book focuses primarily on specific aspects as they relate to European cities. The Guidebook provides you evidence and facts that can help cities decision makers, urban planners and sport organisations develop MOVEment spaces in the communities. In the book you can find inspiring examples from 5 very different cities in Europe: Ljubljana, Copenhagen, Istanbul, Moscow and Barcelona. Book also explains how evaluations can be used in the planning and what kind of tool exists for MOVEment spaces development.

Several cities have made improvements following the measured impacts. Here is an overview how they did it: 15 quick facts for cities - walking and cycling measures, by FLOW project http://h2020-flow.eu/resources/publications/ 

This fact sheet provides actual data from real life cases to support measures on improving walkability and cycling in the city without creating congestion. They describe some surprising results about overall transport efficiency that have been achieved while improving conditions for walking and cycling. You can use it as evidence for your MOVEmet spaces development in your city. These FLOW Quick Facts outline walking and cycling measures can not only improve conditions for pedestrians and cyclists, but also reduce congestion. They describe some results about overall transport efficiency that have been achieved while improving conditions for walking and cycling. So rather than fearing increased congestion, these Quick Facts help inspire city planners to make bold decisions for the streets, using walking and cycling measures to provide a win-win for both the city and the citizens.

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